About your Search

20121108
20121116
SHOW
Book TV 13
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 32
CSPAN2 29
SFGTV2 29
MSNBC 26
MSNBCW 26
CSPAN 23
FOXNEWS 18
CNN 16
CNNW 16
KGO (ABC) 12
WHUT (Howard University Television) 11
KQED (PBS) 10
COM 9
WETA 8
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 340
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 341 (some duplicates have been removed)
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most significant cases in the country. lawyers in the civil rights division get fanned out to places in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and ser
, and a progressive impulse that focused on some moral imperatives starting with civil rights. what you see is that senate was at the forefront of everything and accomplish an enormous amount over that period of time. host: what is it about the times we live in now makes the operation of the senate different from the way the senate operates during the time you were writing about between 1962 and 1980? guest: i always say it is harder to be a search senator today with the demands of campaign fund-raising -- to be a senator today with the demands of campaign fund-raising and the type of media we have, 24 our media, political conversation on facebook and twitter - 24-hour media, political conversation on facebook and twitter. those senators focus on national interests. what has gone on during the last 20 years and has worsened on -- during the obama presidency is a hyper-partisan senate. they have become polarized and paralyzed. host: ari shapiro is the author of the last great senate. we will be talking about what the ramifications are, from his perspective, of the senate's our inability to d
are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the country, we have seen too many school districts, quite frankly, that have been slow to respond. and that is why we have to come together like this. that is why we have to get out of our lane and understand that we've got to make house calls. we've got to move beyond the tradition
government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said,
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say something. i get to say something. as everyone in this room knows, youngest mayor in 100 years, right? youngest mayor in 100 years when he was elected 10 years ago and he has remained an effective and visionary leader for everyone. mayor newsom gained worldwide recognition when he granted marriage licenses to same sex couples in 2004. we all remember those moving pictures of smiling couples on the steps of city hall, some of them their children watching on. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national spotlight and cemented his reputation as a fearless public officials who does what he thinks is right. under mayor newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of.
suggested booker was somewhat of a civil rights icon. >> yes. >> a family secret, lost on a forgotten piece of film. >> night after night i lay down and dream about what i went through. i don't want my children to go through it. >> explosive then. haunting now. >> i said they could come and kill you. he says i want to be heard. >> raw words with great risk and great power to change. >> my heart broke for him. i didn't realize how much jeopardy he was putting himself in. >> tonight, a journey back in time to unlock a mystery and uncover the truth. >> if we're willing to take a chance, take a risk, then we can all make a difference. >> finding booker's place. >>> welcome to "dateline," everyone, i'm lester holt. what do you know about your ancestors? a lot of us may not know much before our grandparents. the young woman in tonight's story didn't even know that. she started a search and crossed paths with a hollywood producer who was on a mission of his own. their journey took them to the deep south at a violent time during the battle for civil rights. on an old film, an nbc documentary in fac
. the republicans nominated barry goldwater, lbj signed civil rights. the republican party learned we can never be anticivil rights. rich 5rd nixon was pro civil rights. it was the southern strategy, northern white ethnics, we're going to suddenly stoke reserchtment. >> crime. >> crime, welfare. >> remember that number. >> so the result is since 1964 there hasn't been an election where the democratic party got less than 80% of the black vote. yes, i think republicans are going to line up as a party against comprehensive immigration reform. that will be like the republicans after '64 saying we're for civil rights. the question is does the tone change the way it didn't with republicans and plaque voters? >> i think a weird thing that's going on, it feels that it's going on, it feels like there's this white folks are done. the cover of "newsweek" on the one hand it shows the president represented as napoleon. at the top it says, you're old, you're white, you're history, right? at the top. i'm thilg, actually, no, if you're old and white you control most of the economic resources, you have a longer
and for a variety of progressive social issues. several states stood on the side of civil rights by not standing in front of same-sex marriage. and in massachusetts, a measure to allow medical marijuana also won, but voters in oregon and arkansas went the other way and just said no. back with us to see what kind of progressive politics will play in the president's second term are correspondent keli goff and christine pelosi, chair of the california democratic party women's caucus. christine let me start with you, president obama, progressive issues he should tackle. >> health care and climate change. we have to ensure that we actually get the health care that was promised under obamacare. make sure the state exchanges were set up. also in keeping with that it means fulfilling the promise to medicare and medicaid. we have to live healthier eyes and make sure our kids are covered. number two, climate. mother nature has spoken. we must listen. >> jennifer: i totally agree, kelly if you were to take the top two issues, what would it be? >> i'm going to pick chun. i would say c
community activists, civil rights activists, that looked like me, that looked like many of us. and then in the newspapers i saw two asians and they were speaking always passionately about asian american civil rights. well, they were professor ling chee wang and henry durham. and when i was actually quite despairing, i was quite despairing, it was coming down it a crucial vote in 2007 and then 2008 for the college board to support this campus, they came to the fore, they organized the community, the community rose up probably one of the first few times in the history of the chinese community in san francisco, they rose up from the ground and they said, we want this campus, we're fighting for this campus and you better vote for this campus, and guess what, we passed it and we got the campus. so this campus has been built and raised and all of us community activists, ling chee wang, all you old-timers, we built it for current generations and generations as yell yet unborn. our forefathers came hear to build the railroads. they came hear to build the railroads but really to build
one of of the nation's landmark civil rights laws. >>> and making a difference, look who is helping the folks hardest hit on the east coast, the same folks who know the most about what it is like. nightly news begins now. >>> good evening. he is the most prominent and best-known general of the modern era, david petraeus as a four-star u.s. army veteran petraeus, with so much over the combat strategy over the past ten days. a four-star veteran, when rumors surfaced he may be stepping down as head of the cia, some speculated he was running for president. instead, he announced he would step down because of an extramarital affair. at a time when the cia was under fire for all it didn't know about the attack on benghazi, it is a huge step for the newly re-elected president, and a profound personal failing for an officer who has given so much to his country. we begin tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell who broke the story, in our d.c. news room. >> reporter: good evening, his resignation because of an extramarital affair sent shock waves through the administration and everyone who knew his
the civil rights movement and the only toward the last ten years that i started to zero in on questions of what makes an individual try to change history. but i would argue this is a strong coherence in all of this because when you are writing about a social movement which i was writing about, the four sit in students who led the sit in movement and sat down in north carolina in 1960, dealing with what happened to those four people. how they put their lives on the line. when they did that, within nine weeks in 54 cities, nine different states, a new phase of the civil-rights revolution happened because four decided to make history. that got me really interested. i did write a biography -- it helps to highlight what makes someone come to the point of acting decisively to intervene in historical moments and change things. and so over time i have come to value the idea of the personal and political coming together, i wrote a book called private lives public consequences, it ended with an essay on bill and hillary clinton. the more i looked at the clintons the more i became aware how incred
lawsuit filed in federal court today. nudists say their civil rights are about to be violated. >> it's not every day, you can see nudists marching down the streets of san francisco. they were heading to the federal court to file what action lawsuit against ax8oñ proposed nudity ban in the city. >> civil rights issue and it's worth fighting for our civil rights. >> supervisor scott weiner proposed the measure because he believes naked guys have taken over a plaza. that made him the target of the lawsuit in that rally at city hall. >> we're here today in response to fundamental freed ym. >> nudist as loued on the nudity here, is outlawed. no one crossed that line. the board votes next week on what, for more than one reason is being called weiner bill. in san francisco, abc 7 news. >> skiers and snowboarders hitting slopes this afternoon. a total of six resorts will be ready for business this weekend. the season beginning earlier than a traditional opening thanks to cold temperatures and last week's snow. coming up on abc 7 news at 5:00 you'll hear from skiers in a live report. >> driv
the election was, well, this is really a civil rights issue and that people are using the bible to confuse the matter. and i thought, yeah, that is so true. it is true. it really is a civil rights matter. the truth is that it is a civil rights issue your story of how this happens and being forced into risky proactivity, in terms of the kind of candidate that we are voting on, keep thinking about what i said before about how the democrats are in this full throated defense of women's rights and it turned out to be really effective for them. i also think about the 2008 race. to give this incredibly moving and full throated voice to this issue that everyone had been scared to make too much of the fact that he was black. later, hillary clinton, who had not been very good about talking about the history, and i think one of the lessons that perhaps the progressives could take from a lot of these stories is that in the years that kinds of people have begun to be included, we have been very shy about making our voices on these matters heard. hopefully we'll no one notice that we are just part of it
, but this is really a civil rights issue. when you talk about not only the civil rights leaders supporting this, but also the naacp was on point. >> that's right. i don't know if people around the country -- maybe they didn't see it, but julian bond was recruited to do a lot of ads. he's an icon in the civil rights movement. but then again, it didn't have much of an impact in prince george's county, because you've got a strong religious community, you have -- you know, you still have this as a moral issue. and they're divided because at the same time, they know it's a civil rights issue, and i think in prince george's county, the moral issue won out. >> well, it work but not by very much. the measure was struck down in prince george's by 485 votes. expectations are high following the vote to expand gambling in maryland, which passed 52-48%. and by a much wider margin in prince george's. it was an expensive fight, as we all know. casinos are already ordering table games. a license still has to be awarded and the baltimore casino has to be built first before the prince george's casino can be open
starting with civil rights. what you see is that senate was at the forefront of everything and accomplish an enormous amount over that period of time. host: what is it about the times we live in now makes the operation of the senate different from the way the senate operates during the time you were writing about between 1962 and 1980? guest: i always say it is harder to be a search senator today with the demands of campaign fund-raising -- to be a senator today with the demands of campaign fund-raising and the type of media we have, 24 our media, political conversation on facebook and twitter - 24-hour media, political conversation on facebook and twitter. those senators focus on national interests. what has gone on during the last 20 years and has worsened on -- during the obama presidency is a hyper-partisan senate. they have become polarized and paralyzed. host: ari shapiro is the author of the last great senate. we will be talking about what the ramifications are, from his perspective, of the senate's our inability to deal with the fiscal cliff. he is a longtime former senate staffer
's a serious threat. any time a core civil right statute is before the supreme court testing its constitution ality we need to wake up and focus on it. we're not happy that the case is back there. we don't think it needed to be there. but we're prepared to defend it as we have successfully in the past. >> is the -- am i right to describe the voting rights act particularly the parts of it that are being challenged with this case, as sort of maximum point of federal leverage over whether or not the states do right in administering their elections? >> i think it's really a core protection. it's a fundamental piece of the whole civil rights canon. so many civil rights statutes are based on the model and the decisions upholding the voting rights act. it's really amongst the most important statutes, not only civil rights statutes, but statutes of any kind that our federal legislature has passed. >> i'm struck by the timing here. i don't understand the inner workings of the supreme court to know enough about why they would make an announcement about a case like this on this kind of a time frame. i'm
and it is one of the hurley ones. they say the church betrayed jesus and again he wrote that before the civil rights movement and of course king is powerful affected. so thurman really is the spiritual dangerous. he was an elder, but he was criticized for not doing the streets. the others will hold it together and make sure the values of the spiritualty is end beaud and thurman played a role. when dr. martin luther king, jr. was stabbed, he asked for one person at his bed and that was howard thurman. king was very close to thurman. >> it is a great history and how i link that to her influence is tremendous. hilda guard, again, what would you say is outside the ecology and earn convenientment and the social injustices, what are some of the things she would be addressing? >> well the church. >> let's come back to that, please. join us, as we speak of hilda guard with dr. matthew fox. . >>> welcome back, you see these pictures here. i mentioned hilda guard in fairfield and one of my members was in germany just a couple of weeks ago and she is a chairperson and she said i was just there. so i tho
certain civil rights. >>> that sex scandal that brought down david petraeus continues to grow and it continues to get more bizarre. now another high level military commander is under investigation. emily smith has the new twists in this case. >> reporter: in simple terms this is a story about a top general david petraeus, his successor john allen and two women. the fbi, cia, pentagon, the white house and congress. >> i am puzzled by what has occurred in the fbi investigation. >> reporter: the form e director admitted to an affair with broadwell which came to light when the fbi investigated what were described as jealous e-mails that broadwell sent to kelley. now allen is under investigation for sending e- mails to kelley. authorities are scouring 20 to 30,000 pages of document. >> it makes you wonder how he would have the time to do it and motivation to do that from afar. >> reporter: the news about allen which president obama learned about the same day petraeus resigned has put allen's nomination to be nato's stream commander on hold. he remains on duty in afghanistan. >> the
" motorcycce clubs. & 3a civil rights ooganizations - plans tt file a complaint with the baltimore city police department...following a foo455investigatiin. -3 investigation.the issue pade on the officer's facebook pagg.onn posting rrads.. 3 baltimore."the officer also &pposted a video he recorded on the job of a car fire.during -the footage, yyu can overhear the officer as well as a ccmmander joking about the pccne.fox 45 lso uncovered comments tte offfcer posted that refeernce hhw he looks forward to flexing his powwrr to punish a suupect. 3 1:04:11 wwat might be insignificant or funny to one person mayynot be to anothhr person so were very concerned about it :17 and were also concerned about the policing practices of this officer -3&pbecause :22 those sentiments coulddpotentially be leading to a indset so were concerned streets of baltimore city :29 :29 ssmeelegal experts tell fox 455this is a perfect example of why theepolice department shouud have a social media policy. 3 we're findinggout now... that a oard responsible for oveeseeing baltimore's e
with safety and with dignity and independence in the community in accordance with our civil rights, you know, as what's affirmed under the olmstead decision to support people living in the community. so this legislation that was introduced i think is a very important step towards supporting people here and you can expect to be hearing more about it over the next two months and i would encourage everybody to come to the hearings as the legislation is actually discussed in committee and at the board and to voice your support. another piece of that legislation, too, would mandate the installation of telephone jacks in the units because of course communication sometimes is that life and death link to emergency services. i also wanted to bring to the attention of the council a new committee that will start meeting next week. it's called the accessible parking policy advisory committee. this is sponsored by the municipal transportation authority. the first meeting will be on tuesday, october 23, at 2:00 pm at 1 south van ness. the public is welcome. what the committee plans to do is review exi
because this is issue of civil rights and fairness. >> there are lots of folks who don't think it's about civil rights but special rights. everybody has right to marry. the question is do you have special right to marry somebody in this country, we say marriage is between man and woman, no, me as woman don't have right to go out marry two men or one woman. i can marry another man. my rights are not insinged, yours are not infringed gay person is not infringed they just can't marry somebody of the same sex. >> do you see it pat passing in maryland, maine or washington? >> these are not consevertive states. maryland is not a conservative state but i will tell you one of the things we've seen we've been around the country in places like maryland predominantly -- marriage is an issue that really crosses religious groups, it crosses ethnic groups, it's really a uniter rather than divider issue. you go to the marriage rallies sometimes half the audience is black, half white. it's an issue that a lot of different folks come together. >> quickly on this. >> this issue will be seen when it's ever
to be here. thanks. >> eliot: there has been a dramatic shift in civil rights in particular as it pertains to same-sex marriage. there are a couple of cases before the supreme court this year on that issue. what will the supreme court do? will they find a constitutional right to same-sex marriage or find a more limited constitutional prohibition on discrimination against same-sex couples? >> well, they haven't yet agreed to take a case from california and they could just let things lie in which case a lower court ruling would stand that generates same-sex marriage for california on a very narrow theory that because california at one point has same-sex marriage, you can't take it back. that's unfair to take it back once you've done it. and if they just leave things be then they've got california basically on the same side as now nine other states. the six that we had before basically from new england and iowa. that's connecticut and new york and massachusetts and vermont new hampshire and iowa. then just thi
in coming month. richard kim is here, maya wily, civil rights attorney and founder of the center for social inclusion. jonathan cohen and political satyrist liz win stead, co-creator of the daily show. >>> do you think i have that right? do you think the nation said i want an active government? >> i'm a little more pessimistic than that. what the nation said that they objected the romney/ryan agenda. they rejected the idea that society made of takers and givers and the job creators are the people that have to be exalted. i think they voted for preserving the social safety net. i don't know approximate they voted for growing that, because obama didn't run on that largely. >> he did run, jonathan, on the notion of the end of bush era tax cuts at the very top. it feels like, if there is a mandate, that mandate has everything to do with the perception of the opposition, right? if the opposition cowers there's a mandate, if not, there's not a mandate. i want to listen to the president himself that he believes the mandate about taxes. let's listen to that. >> i refuse to accept any approach that
members of labor unions, farm groups, and civil rights organizations. it included represents not just of the medical profession, but of the people who needed and used health care. that summer a woman named florence greenberg traveled from chicago, illinois to washington to offer her testimony. greenberg was a member of the women's auxiliary spending her days working in the communities around chicago's steel mills. greenberg told the audience that the national health conference that he had come to offer them a different picture of chicago. just steps away from the comfortable headquarter of the american medical association, was a chicago of dirt, filth, and tenements, of sick chicago where people struggled with terrible health con decisions relatedded to poverty and unemployment and struggled to obtain baiivel medical care. the overcrowded cook county hospital. the city's only hospital which locals described as death house. a single overcrowded private hospital served the entire african-american community of the south side. chicago's outpatient clinics were fill the to busting. she spo
already for a lot of folks on the right. >> with the exception of the civil rights movement have you ever seen change take place regarding cultural mores and behavior more than it happened with gay people and marriage equality and all of that which seemed to come out positively in this election? have you ever seen change like this? >> well, i think that what's important to note though is that these changes came about as a result of the gay rights movement which has been very fierce for a long time, and they've not given up. i think that that effort was very similar to the civil rights movement, and the women's movement and that sort of thing. >> i have a somewhat different view. i think that when you look at the history of same sex marriage in particular it's an issue that a lot of folks in the official gay rights movement were skeptical towards. but then you had some folks at the local level in massachusetts, places like that who really kept pushing the issue even though early on it looked like an issue that was going to be very unpopular and difficult. yet they kept pushing it. and you'
widespread accusations of discrimination and civil rights abuses against latinos as well as financial misconduct. election officials in maricopa county have acknowledged some 415,000 early and provisional ballots remain uncounted, a total that could wipe out our pile's election victory of the 88,000 votes. activists have been holding vigils outside the maricopa county recorder's office, demanding that the votes be counted and alleging election date irregularities. a man claiming to be a business owner and las vegas says publicly he has fired 22 of his more than 140 mostly hispanic employees because of president obama's re-election. speaking anonymously on the radio,he man blamed the expected cost of president obama's healthcare law. >> i explained to them a month ago if obama gets an office, the regulations for obamacare will hurt our business and i'm going to have to make provisions to make sure i have enough money to cover the payroll taxes, the additional health-care i'm going to have to do, and i explained to them and says -- you do what you needed to in your heart, but i a mornin
spirits, codify intolerance and the fact that some people are offended reduced the civil right scptsd liberties that we have here and you need to consider the slippery slope you're creating this ban. >> thank you very much. thank you for your work. next speaker. >> good morning supervisors. i am andrew thompson. born and raised in san francisco. 50 years old. i am probably older than you. >> not by much. >> okay. well, both my parents came to this country -- well, i will focus on my mother. she came with her family to escape what was happening in italy with mussolini and about the time i was born in 62 about the time that -- about the time that people were fleeing to the suburbs i asked my mother why aren't we leaving? and she said "i want my children to be raised in the city". back then i grew up in westportal. took the streetcar through the tunnel and i was going to school at seven in the morning just as the castro was winding up their evening, and saw all kinds of things that my mother may not have agreed with, but trusted in the fact that we could go through this city a
is to walk past naked man. public nudity -- we're not fighting for a civil right. i don't want gay people to be nude in public. i don't want straight people to be nude in public, not in my neighborhood and i resent very much this is an issue whether you're a prude or a homo phobe. thanks. >> thank you. next speaker. >> my name is leonard and a resident of the castro and i am happy to have an opportunity to talk to you about the what is called nudity in the cast ro. i am a supporter of nudity. i was an art student and drawing live models since i was a teenager. i go to nude beaches both gay and straight. when i have been to nude beaches with families i find it sweet and endearing. however in the castro i don't believe it's nudity. i believe it's exhibitionism and the issue is for it to function for the exhibitionists they need to cohop without the consent of other people and to me this is not unlike -- even though i believe in the live and let live and it extends too far and
. the mta says private information is well protected. civil rights advocates says storing data that long violates privacy. >>> why necessarily is pulling a -- why nestle is pulling a popular ding off store shelves. -- popular drink off store shelves. >>> why you want to make sure young drivers get plenty >>> check out the forecast for 3:00 in the afternoon temperatures are going to hit mid to upper 50s partly sunny another round of showers moving into the north bay at that time sweeping south across the bay during the latter parts of the afternoon into the evening. traveling the state, snow near the grapevine call ahead and make sure everything is fine there i'm sure it is just wet. snow showers still around tahoe and our next batch developing now to the north. you can see all the areas that is going to get that -- that going to get wet weather, tahoe tops out 30, 50s and 60s across the state. >>> preliminary hearing continues this morning for a u.s. soldier accused of killing 16 afghan civilians. 39-year-old sergeant bales has been charged with the murders. nine of the victims in the ma
that are doing this, i think, represents the modern-day civil rights movement and he understood their power. so months ago, he said -- he issued a kind of executive order that said undocumented immigrants 30 years or younger, if they meet certain criteria, can get deferred action. they can stay illegally in this country for a few years and work and study and not be afraid of deportation. it was a tremendous victory for these young people. but the one more and they're not stopping. they are demanding passage of the dream act. this bus brought them and their parents. it was a family affair and they got out of the bus quickly. i was talking with the first woman came out of the bus and asking her why are you doing this. a media personality came up to me. i cannot even call them journalists. he said, what do they want? what are they doing? i said, they are about to get arrested. and he said, what are they asking for? i said, why don't you ask them? i was interviewing one woman named rosie carasco. and she replied i want to know what kind of legacy president obama wants to lead. how want to know if h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 341 (some duplicates have been removed)